The First American Woman to Win the Boston Marathon in 33 Years

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The First American Woman to Win the Boston Marathon in 33 Years

Alex Van Duyne, Social Media Manager

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It was a frigid and rainy day in Greater Boston on April 16, 2018. The Boston Marathon would be a challenge for all of the runners who would be required to run 26.2 miles in this weather. This was the first time in 33 years that an American woman has taken the crown and won this race.

American Olympic representative of 2012 and 2016, Desiree Linden won the Boston Marathon with a time of 2 hours, 39 minutes, and 54 seconds.

Previously, in 2011, Linden lost the Boston Marathon by a mere 2 seconds, behind the winner Caroline Kiel.  Desiree Linden’s time was 2 hours, 22 minutes, and 38 seconds, which is her current record for a marathon run.

After around 45 minutes after the run started, Desiree Linden waited for her teammate Shalane Flanagan when she stopped for a bathroom break. This didn’t stop her from coming in first place!

“It’s supposed to be hard,” Linden said, after the run. “I just want to thank John Hancock and the BAA for giving me the chance year after year and believing in me, sometimes when I didn’t believe in myself. It’s good to get it done.”

The first Boston Marathon was in 1897 with only 15 people, but now, an average of 30,000 join every year. This year, the conditions in Boston for the runners was rough. At the very beginning of the run it was 38 degrees Fahrenheit, with fierce rain all morning.

The runner up for the Boston Marathon women’s race was Sarah Sellers, a full time nurse. She was one of the 7 American women to place in the top 10. With a time of 2 hours, 44 minutes, and 27 seconds, Sellers ended up being quite behind Desiree Linden.

The reason why Sellers joined the Boston Marathon was because of her brother, whose time was 2 hours, 48 minutes, and 20 seconds. Because of her job as a full time nurse she mostly trained by herself.

“It means everything,” she said. “This race is a marathon. It’s not a 26.2-mile road race; it’s where marathoners come to do their stuff. To win on this course and to have it be significant for American marathoning means everything,” Linden said.

About the Writer
Alex Van Duyne, Staff Writer

Alex Van Duyne is an 8th grader here at Dana Middle School. She is an only child and her elementary school was South Shores. If she could travel back to...

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