Syrian Chemical Attack: What We Know and US Response

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Syrian Chemical Attack: What We Know and US Response

Emerson Marquez, Staff Writer

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Forces from France, America, and the UK have joined together for retaliatory strikes on Syria after a supposed chemical weapon attack occurred on April 7 in the city of Douma.

Videos show a supposed chemical weapon filled with a deadly combination of chlorine and Sarin gas being dropped in the Syrian city of Douma, and as you might think there was much backlash on this attack. Such as France, America, and the UK teaming up to take down chemical weapon facilities in Syria. But the problem is that the US thought it was ‘probable’ that chemical weapons were used, but that doesn’t mean they know for sure.

The OPCW or Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is the one that regulates chemical weapons and their use, but they were only let into the city last Wednesday. Almost 11 days after the attack,there is speculation that Russia and Syria have been “cleaning” the city up to make it look like it never happened. The samples are currently being transported to the Netherlands for investigation.

The Prime Minister of the UK Theresa May, made the justification of the retaliatory attack by saying it was “right and legal” to order cruise missiles strikes following the chemical attack on civilians. She added that the aim of the overnight attack was the deter Syrian authorities from further use of chemical weapons and to send a message to the world that it was unacceptable to use those kinds of weapons. The attack on Douma has heightened tensions between Russia and Western leaders, already mad at each other over a number of issues, including the poisoning of a Russian ex-spy and his daughter in the UK.

British Prime Minister Theresa May blamed Russia for the attack, and more than 20 countries have expelled over 100 Russian diplomats to show solidarity with Britain over the case. Russia has denied involvement in the poisoning.

Syria’s president, Bashar al-Assad have maintained the demniner of ‘business as usual’ after this attack. Almost to brush off the attack on their own people, and this attack isn’t unusual for Syria. They have had an ongoing battle with terrorist and rebel militants trying to overthrow the government and recently they have been retaliating with a iron fist. And many fear with the help of Russia these attacks are likely to continue.