The Landing on Mars

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The Landing on Mars


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NASA’s Mars Lander, Insight, on November 26th, 2018, at 11:52 am Pacific Standard Time, landed on Mars to study the interior and take the planet’s vital sign, it’s pulse, and temperature, basically checking it’s status and functions.

The Insight landed at Elysium Planitia, which is a broad plain on Mars. It had taken the lander about 8 and a half months to get to the planet and the trip was at least 354 million miles, or 570 kilometers. It first left on the 5th of May, 2018 at around 10:02 am at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. Some engineers refer to the landing phase of a Mars mission as “seven minutes of terror” because the spacecraft has to perform a complex series of actions without mistakes in a very short amount of time. Then because it’s so far away, the craft has to do everything automatically, with no human input or control. Everything had worked out perfectly though. The lander had also gotten its first view of Mars without a lense covering it.

The first sounds of wind on Mars was also captured by the Insight.

Mars is the fourth planet closest to the sun and the second smallest planet after mercury. The planet is named after the Roman god of war, Mars. It is also described as ‘The Red Planet,’ due to its appearance. The planet is a terrestrial planet with a thin atmosphere composed primarily of Carbon Dioxide. Mars is also home to the tallest mountain in the solar system, Olympus Mons, a shield volcano that’s 21 km high and 600 km in diameter.

The Lander will probe deep beneath the surface of the Red Planet to measure temperatures and allow study of its seismic activity. The Mars Lander had already generated more electrical power than any of the previous Mars Vehicles had, setting a new record as soon as it had landed and extended its large solar arrays hours later. 

The Insight’s first picture on Mars.

The Lander’s $850 million mission is scheduled to run for two Earth years, or equivalent to one Mars year. The information and data that’ll be gathered by the lander will help members map out the interior of Mars and reveal key insights about the red planet.